Rachel Gevlin

Visiting Assistant Professor, English

Rm 207 Mellinger Learning Center

Biography

I joined Monmouth’s English department in the fall of 2020 after receiving my Ph.D. in English from Duke University. Prior to those grad school years in North Carolina, I worked as a bookkeeper for an interior designer in New York; a middle school math teacher with the Peace Corps in Burkina Faso, West Africa; and a substitute teacher in my tiny upstate New York hometown. My college years—which were split between a large research university of more than 50,000 students and the rural, 600-student college I to which I ultimately transferred—solidified my commitment to the small, personalized liberal arts experience that places like Monmouth make possible.

Interests

Although my teaching and research primarily focus on eighteenth- and nineteenth century British literature (especially the novel), my scholarly interests also extend to feminist theory, the history of sexuality, legal histories of marriage and divorce, and writing pedagogy. My classes have brought together various aspects of all of these subjects and include courses ranging from first-year composition to surveys (“The Womanizer in Literature: Don Juan to Don Draper”) to advanced single-author courses (“Jane Austen and Masculinity”). My research likewise brings together multiple discourses: my current book project examines the intersection of eighteenth-century divorce law with the erasure of male heterosexual conduct in novels from Samuel Richardson’s Sir Charles Grandison to the works of Jane Austen. An article derived from that project—on adultery in Austen’s Sense and Sensibility and Mansfield Park—is forthcoming in the winter 2021 issue of ELH.

Outside of teaching, researching, and writing, I am an avid hiker and baker, and I spend most of my free time with my dog, Uncle Toby—named (of course) for my favorite eighteenth-century fictional character.

Education

B.A.—Interdisciplinary (literature, math, and Italian), Bennington College, 2010

Ph.D.—English, Duke University, 2020

Courses Taught

ENGL 110: Composition and Argument

ENGL 337: The Origins of the Novel