Requirements

Prof. Audette works with students. Prof. Audette works with students.

At Monmouth, there are no specific requirements to be a pre-law student. We work with you, inside and outside of the classroom, to prepare you for your intended legal career.

Your academic adviser or the pre-law adviser can work with you to select the courses and opportunities that will prepare you for your career or graduate study needs, or see below for some frequently asked questions.

FAQs

  • If I want to go to law school, what should I major in?

    Law schools do not require a specific undergraduate major. The most common majors for incoming law students include political science, psychology, history, philosophy economics, although students are admitted to law school with a variety of different majors every year. For example, communication studies is also a good major to prepare for law school Law schools want to see students who are critical thinkers, excellent writers and engaged citizens. In other words, exactly the type of education that you will get at Monmouth!

  • If I want to go into law enforcement, what should I major in?

    Law enforcement agencies do not require a specific undergraduate major. Some law enforcement officers hold a degree in criminal justice, many choose different areas of study. Common majors include sociology, political science and psychology. Students with a background in computer science, mathematics, data science, foreign languages accounting are also good candidates for jobs in law enforcement.

  • How can I prepare for law school in college?

    At Monmouth, we help you develop the critical thinking, writing and leadership skills you need to be successful in law school. To be a competitive candidate for law school, you should take challenging classes, get good grades, and develop strong relationships with professors who could write letters of recommendation for you. Get involved in student organizations or leadership opportunities, as well as events run by the pre-law program. Begin your preparations for the LSAT early. (We recommend taking the LSAT the summer after your junior year.) Finally, contact the pre-law adviser to discuss your law school ambitions and planning.

  • If I want to go to law school, what should I major in?

    Law schools do not require a specific undergraduate major. The most common majors for incoming law students include political science, psychology, history, philosophy economics, although students are admitted to law school with a variety of different majors every year. For example, communication studies is also a good major to prepare for law school Law schools want to see students who are critical thinkers, excellent writers and engaged citizens. In other words, exactly the type of education that you will get at Monmouth!

  • If I want to go into law enforcement, what should I major in?

    Law enforcement agencies do not require a specific undergraduate major. Some law enforcement officers hold a degree in criminal justice, many choose different areas of study. Common majors include sociology, political science and psychology. Students with a background in computer science, mathematics, data science, foreign languages accounting are also good candidates for jobs in law enforcement.

  • How can I prepare for law school in college?

    At Monmouth, we help you develop the critical thinking, writing and leadership skills you need to be successful in law school. To be a competitive candidate for law school, you should take challenging classes, get good grades, and develop strong relationships with professors who could write letters of recommendation for you. Get involved in student organizations or leadership opportunities, as well as events run by the pre-law program. Begin your preparations for the LSAT early. (We recommend taking the LSAT the summer after your junior year.) Finally, contact the pre-law adviser to discuss your law school ambitions and planning.

  • What do I need for a law school application?

    Most law schools require: an application; resume; transcripts from your undergraduate coursework; an LSAT score; a personal statement; and two to four letters of recommendation (typically from professors who you have taken classes with). If English is not your first language, they may also ask for a standardized English language exam. Some law schools have other unique requirements. Be sure to identify the requirements of each law school before you begin your application process.

    Law schools weight the LSAT score and your GPA most heavily when making admissions and financial aid decisions.

    For more information on law school applications, visit the Law School Admission Council website.

  • What field of law should I go into?

    There are many different fields of legal practice, including business, corporate, criminal, environmental, immigration, personal injury, public interest and tax law, to name but a few. Law schools do not expect you to know what type of law you want to practice before you apply. Besides, your interests might change once you take classes or gain legal experience in law school.

    If you are passionate about one or a few particular types of law, you may end up taking different courses to expand your knowledge in these areas. This is a great discussion to have with your academic adviser or the pre-law adviser as you are enrolling for courses.

  • How do I participate in the moot court competition?

    All Monmouth students are eligible to participate in the moot court competition, which is held in the fall. For more information on how to participate, contact the pre-law adviser.

    Moot court is offered as a participation course in the fall. You do not need to take the course in order to participate in the competition. All students, whether they are enrolled in the course, are able to attend the informational and tutoring sessions to prepare for the competition. The course will provide additional opportunities to learn about the selected case and practice for the oral arguments and/or brief writing competitions.