Courses

HIST 110. U.S. History: to 1865 1.0 course credit

The purpose of this course is to analyze the political, cultural and intellectual history of the United States from 1607-1865. It will explore the different strategies implemented by the British, Dutch, French, and Spanish to stake their claim and colonize the area we now know as the United States. Questions we will concern ourselves with are, for example, what were the various attempts made to implement social progress, economic modernization, intellectual development, and political freedom?

HIST 111. U.S. History: 1865-Present 1.0 course credit

This course traces the history of the United States from Reconstruction to the Post-Cold War period. Themes that this course analyzes include: the rise of the New South and Jim Crow, the expansion of the West and Native nations, industrialization and immigration, the Gilded Age and the Great Depression, the World Wars, the Cold War, and the Civil Rights movement.

HIST 112. Black America: A History 1.0 course credit

This course will examine the history of Black America from 1865 to 2000. It is organized around important themes in African American history, including the legacies of slavery, reconstruction, the ideology of racism, the Harlem Renaissance, Radical Black Intellectuals, the Civil Rights Movement, and Black Feminism.

HIST 120. Intro to Latin American 1.0 course credit

(Cross-listed with LAST 120) Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will present historical and culturally diverse materials. Major themes we will study include: cultural encounters, political and religious conquests, race as a social and historical category, decolonization, the creation of new nation states, economic inequality, gender relations, political and cultural revolutions, military dictatorship and, finally, the return to democracy. A historical framework will structure and inform our study of Latin America.

HIST 141. Intro to Chinese History 1.0 course credit

This course will trace Chinese history from the locations of some of the oldest civilizations in the world until the sprawling country of modern times. WE will consider questions such as what ‘China’ is and what it means to be ‘Chinese’, how governing elites changed over time, gender roles throughout the centuries, and China’s larger place in a global context.

HIST 190. Archives 0.25 course credit

A work experience in the college archives. How to handle materials, catalog them, and locate them for individuals and class use. Student should not be enrolled concurrently in an archives class and HIST 300. Consent of instructor required.

HIST 195. Archaeology Lab 0.25 course credit

(Cross-listed with CLAS 195) Touch the past. Work directly on Monmouth’s extensive collection of Native American artifacts, check out other local collections of various cultures’ histories, and learn broadly-applicable archaeological techniques.

HIST 220. Modern Global History 1.0 course credit

This course will examine modern global history (1450 to the present). We will travel through a great deal of space (the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa) and time (over 500 years), so in order to better comprehend the different historical eras and places, we will organize the course around important themes rather than adhering to a strictly chronological analysis. These themes include: the creation of an Atlantic World, colonization, slavery, revolutions, political ideologies, religious upheavals, independence, modernization, decolonization, and artistic movements.

HIST 221. World History of Food 1.0 course credit

The aim of this course is to analyze the complex role(s) of food in societies. WE will use food as a lens to study world history. In particular, we are interested in exploring how food helps one to further elucidate questions of race, politics, gender, social inequality, nationalism, empires, and globalization.

HIST 241. Japan’s Royal Court 1.0 course credit

The Helan period (794-1185) has usually been considered the peak of the Japanese royal court. This course will look at sources ranging from noblewomen’s diaries, to court records, to gardening treatises, to city plans in order to understand more about life as a member of Japan’s nobility, and consider how it changed when the warrior government of the Kamakura (1185-1333) period took power.

HIST 242. Japan’s Architecture/Artifacts 1.0 course credit

Historians traditionally rely on the written record to understand the lifestyles of people in the past. Yet by doing that, particularly in societies where literacy was not universal, we only can learn about a small segment of society; the elite record-keepers, usually the nobility or ruling class. If other societal groups such as farmers or artisans are featured in those records it is from an outsider’s point of view, as the authors of those records describe others’ activities from afar. While it is impossible to answer all of the questions about the lives of nonliterate peoples, incorporating evidence from the archaeological record can shed light on the lifestyles and habits of those sectors of society, as well as give new insights into the lives of the record-keepers. This course will use archaeological evidence, architectural studies, and material culture studies to learn more about the aspects of life that cannot be captured through the written word alone. Through these alternative methods we will examine the accuracy of the written histories and explore the legacies ‘in small things forgotten’.

HIST 260. Historian’s Craft 1.0 course credit

Created for sophomore History majors and minors, the Historian’s Craft will provide an introduction to the ways in which historians conceptualize the past, conduct research in primary sources, and write well, through the study of good historical prose. The centerpiece of the course is a research paper through which students will learn the varieties of approaches historians take as they formulate questions, select sources, analyze documents, take notes, and draft, edit, and complete research papers.

HIST 290. Archives Practicum 0.5 course credit

Study in the theory and practice of archival work. Involves supervision of students in 190. Usually offered in the fall. May be repeated for credit. May not be taken in the same semester as HIST-300. Pre-requisite: HIST-190.

HIST 293. Maritime Archaeology 1.0 course credit

Maritime archaeologist use information from shipwrecks, submerged settlements, cargo deposits, wharves and other shoreline sites to piece together stories about the sailors, laborers, passengers, stevedores, and shipwrights who speak to us through artifacts left behind. This class will introduce the history, research procedures, and interpretive procedures of maritime archaeologists by learning how to interpret excavations throughout the world. Students will learn about the geographic and typographic range of maritime sites as well as the archaeologist’s duties to the site and to the public.

HIST 300. Topics in Latin America 1.0 course credit

Topics in Latin America, is a junior level course designed to explore in greater depth material introduced during the various history survey courses. In addition to covering content, this course will focus on how to write a historiographical essay.

HIST 301. Topics in Asian History 1.0 course credit

Topics in Asian History, is a junior level course designed to explore in greater depth material introduced during the various history survey courses. In addition to covering content, this course will focus on how to write a historiographical essay

HIST 302. Topics in U.S. History 1.0 course credit

Topics in U.S. History, is a junior level course designed to explore in greater depth material introduced during the various history survey courses. In addition to covering content, this course will focus on how to write a historiographical essay

HIST 303. Topics in European History 1.0 course credit

Topics in European History, is a junior level course designed to explore in greater depth material introduced during the various history survey courses. In addition to covering content, this course will focus on how to write a historiographical essay

HIST 400. Senior Research Seminar 1.0 course credit

Using secondary and primary sources, students explore a topic of their choosing. Meeting weekly, this course is organized as a directed workshop and includes a combination of readings, discussions, writings, and students’ joint evaluation of each other’s works-in-progress. The assigned reading is light; it is intended to give a brief introduction to some of the main topics historians discuss when writing and research. After the first month, students work independently, carrying out work in a timely fashion, as assignments that factor into the final product will be due periodically. Class participation includes in-class peer evaluations in which students demonstrate a general understanding of the research process through the constructive criticism of their peers’ work. Individual conferences with the professor on student progress will complement the directed workshop discussions and are integrated in the course schedule. Pre-requisite: Two of the following course completed successfully – HIST 300, HIST 301, HIST 302, HIST 303