Courses

ENGR 101. Introduction to Engineering I 0.5 course credit

Engineering is the joining of many disciplines in creative ways to build solutions to complex problems. To be a successful engineer, an individual must be able to solve problems, work in teams, communicate effectively, and understand the culture, content, and context of their work. The goal of this course is to introduce students to a variety of engineering subdisciplines and to introduce them to engineering thinking and communicating so that they can discover if engineering is for them. Students will begin to develop the skills that they need with simple mathematics and statistics, engineering software, (MatLab, NQC, Solidworks, Autocad, Eagle, etc.) and use that knowledge with hardware (Arduinos, 3D-Printers, Light Machine Works, etc.). Students will work in teams to solve one or more engineering problems, culminating with a plan or prototype by the end of the semester.

ENGR 102. Introduction to Engineering II 0.5 course credit

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Engineering I. In this continuing course, students will take the projects that they proposed and prototyped in the earlier course and build and improve them via an iterative process, culminating a final completed project that has been through multiple revisions. Students will be required to discuss important aspects of the project, how it addresses the required features and how it was improved via an iterative process of learning.

ENGR 208. Classical Mechanics (Cross-listed as PHYS 208) 1.0 course credit

An introduction to the study of particles and systems under the action of various types of forces. Includes Harmonic Oscillator, Central Force and Lagrangian formulation. This course makes elegant use of mathematical techniques in solving physical problems. Prerequisites: MATH 254 and PHYS 132 or permission of the instructor.

ENGR 209. Statics (Cross-listed as PHYS 209) 1.0 course credit

An introduction to analysis of forces acting on particles and rigid bodies. Topics include statics of particles, rigid bodies and equivalent systems of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, distributed forces, analysis of structures, forces in cables in beams, friction, and moments of inertia. Prerequisite: PHYS 130 or permission of the instructor. Offered in rotation as needed. ENGR 222. Engineering Computation 0.5 course credit This course focuses on developing the computational skills that engineers need. Students will learn techniques in a variety of software packages (e.g. MatLab, Labview, Mathematica, Solidworks, and others) as is dictated by the evolution of software tools in engineering. Prerequisites: MATH 141 ready or permission of instructor.

ENGR 325. Materials Science (Cross-listed as PHYS 325 Solid-State Physics) 1.0 course credit

An introduction to solid-state physics, including crystal structure and the thermal, dielectric and magnetic properties of solids. Topics include: band theory and semiconductors, phonons, and superconductivity. Prerequisite: PHYS 310 or permission of the instructor. Offered in rotation as needed.

ENGR 340. Fluids 1.0 course credit

Engineered systems must use and manage the flow of all kinds of fluids. From ships to airplanes, heating systems to power plants, all depend on fluid flow. Understanding, managing, and designing systems is an essential part of what a mechanical engineer does. This course moves beyond the simple fluid dynamics done in PHYS 134 to treat more complex topics with greater sophistication. Topics include fluid statics and dynamics, a variety of computational modeling and solving techniques, as well as open and closed channel flow. Prerequisites: PHYS 134 or permission of the instructor.

ENGR 350. Engineering Seminar 0.0 course credit

Communicating ideas in engineering is an important and crucial skill. This course is a continuation of Introduction to Engineering I. The purpose of Engineering Seminar is to introduce students to giving and listening to scientific/engineering presentations and to participating in scientific/engineering discussions. In this course, students will be expected to give a talk and actively participate in seminar discussions. Prerequisites: Junior or senior status or permission of instructor.

ENGR 420. Senior Project 1.0 course credit

This course is the Capstone experience for all senior engineering students. Using the many engineering skills and techniques that they have acquired, they will do a team-based project that as directed by an engineering or science faculty member. Teams will present their work at various points in the course. It is meant to be taken in two successive semesters to give a yearlong experience. Prerequisites: Senior status or permission of instructor.


Chemical Engineering concentration

ENGC 201. Introduction to Chemical Engineering 0.5 course credit

The goal of this course to introduce students to the profession of chemical engineering, guide students through the principles of engineering design and problem solving, and help students develop communication and team-work skills. Prerequisites: CHEM 140 and ENGR 102 or permission of the instructor.

ENGC 270. Inorganic Chemistry (Cross-listed as CHEM 270) 1.0 course credit

An introduction to inorganic chemistry. Topics including atomic structure, ionic, covalent, and metallic substances, acids and bases, coordination compounds, and descriptive chemistry of the elements. Students will use electronic structure, modern bonding theories, and models to systematically understand the properties of inorganic substances. This course includes one 3-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: a grade of C- or better in CHEM 140 and sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGC 302. Thermodynamics II 1.0 course credit

This course is a continuation of Thermodynamics I, where students will study thermodynamics from a chemical engineering perspective. After reviewing the ideas that were covered in Thermodynamics I, this course focuses on applications and ideas that are most common for chemical engineers. Topics include equations of state, mixtures, modeling phase equilibrium, vapor-liquid equilibrium, and applications of interest to chemical engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 141 ready or permission of instructor.

ENGC 312. Physical Chemistry I (Cross-listed as CHEM 312) 1.0 course credit

A study of classical chemical thermodynamics and kinetics. Includes a four-hour laboratory each week which emphasizes modern physical and biophysical chemistry methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 220, MATH 152 and PHYS 132.

ENGC 333. Chemical Reaction Engineering 1.0 course credit

Topics included in this course will include: rate forms for homogeneous, catalytic, and biological reactions; isothermal and non-isothermal reactor design and analysis; interpretation of laboratory data; introduction to non-ideal flow and residence-time distributions. Prerequisites: CHEM 312, MATH 252, or permission of instructor.

ENGC 342. Process Engineering 1.0 course credit

This course will cover applications of engineering, economic, environmental, and ethical principles in preliminary process design using computer aids such as process simulators. Specific topics will include problem definition literature survey, flowsheet development, material and energy balances, equipment design, profitability analysis, oral and written communication. Prerequisite: CHEM 312. Co-Requisites: ENGC 302 or ENGR 420.


Electrical Engineering concentration

ENGE 190. Digital Electronics 1.0 course credit

An introduction to digital circuit design, both combinational and sequential, and their application in constructing digital instruments, may include microprocessor and elementary assembly language. There is a strong laboratory component to this course.

ENGE 201. Introduction to Electrical Engineering 0.5 course credit

This course is an introduction to the concepts and practice of electrical engineering. Survey electrical engineering as a discipline while developing foundational skills in electronics, electric circuit design, and simulation, testing, simple programming and trouble shooting. Prerequisite: ENGR 102 or permission of instructor.

ENGE 210. Circuit Analysis (Cross-listed as PHYS 210) 1.0 course credit

Introduction to the techniques of analyzing resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits. Topics include: Kirchhoff’s rules, Thevenin’s theorem, node-voltage method, mesh-current method, and properties of RI, RC, and RLC circuits. Prerequisite: PHYS 132 or permission of the instructor.

ENGE 211. Electric Circuits (Cross-listed as PHYS 211) 1.0 course credit

Topics include: high and low pass filters, differentiators, integrators, detailed study of transistor circuits, operational amplifiers, comparators, Schmitt triggers, and oscillator circuits. There is a strong laboratory component to this course. Prerequisite: PHYS 132 or permission of the instructor.

ENGE 333. Signals/Signal Processing 1.0 course credit

This course covers the detection and processing of electrical signals. Topics include time and transform domain representations, Fourier Series techniques, Fourier, Laplace and other transforms and discrete transform techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 151 or higher or permission of instructor.

ENGE 390. Electronics 1.0 course credit

This course treats a wide range of electronic circuits, focusing on diode and transistor-based design, analysis, DC and low-frequency AC, amplification. It also provides the necessary physics background for understanding how transistor and other circuits work at a more fundamental level. Prerequisites: ENGE 201, and ENGE 190/PHYS 190 or PHYS 210 or PHYS 211 or Permission of Instructor.

ENGE 410. Electric Conversion 1.0 course credit

This course treats the conversion of energy between electrical and mechanical forms. Topics covered include electromechanical devices (e.g. motors, generators), transformers, and power transmission. Prerequisites: ENGE 390 or ENGE 333 or permission of instructor.


Mechanical Engineering concentration

ENGM 201. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering 0.5 course credit

This course is an introduction to the concepts and practice of mechanical engineering. Survey Mechanical Engineering as a discipline while developing foundational skills in measurement, data analysis, simple design and reporting, simulation, testing, simple programming and troubleshooting. Prerequisites: ENGR 102 or permission of instructor.

ENGM 270. Mechanics of Materials 1.0 course credit

This course is an investigation into the mechanics of materials. Topics covered include stress, strain, axial deformation, torsion, equilibrium of beams, stresses and deflection of beams, pressure vessels and bugling of columns and other topics that are of interest to mechanical engineers. Co-requisite: PHYS 134 or permission of instructor.

ENGM 301. Thermodynamics I 1.0 course credit

This course is the first of a two-semester sequence on thermodynamics for engineering students. It focuses on thermodynamics from a mechanical engineering perspective, treating principles including the thermodynamic properties of substances, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, efficiency, power and refrigeration cycles. Co-requisite: PHYS 134 or permission of instructor.

ENGM 305. Finite Element Modeling 0.5 course credit

This course is an introduction to finite element methods (FEM) of design and simulation. In this course, students will use a variety of software tools to simulate mechanical components under both thermal and physical stresses. Students will explore the power and limitations of FEM tools and techniques. Prerequisite: ENGM 201 or permission of instructor

ENGM 320. Heat Transfer 1.0 course credit

Heat Transfer is an important part of designing modern engineered devices. Managing heat transfer is important to many applications and this course is an introduction to the principles of managing heat. Prerequisites: ENGM 301 or permission of instructor.

ENGM 321. Thermal Design 1.0 course credit

This course combines the earlier principles that students learned in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer with the ideas of design to treat the process of designing systems that move and manage heat. It also treats the ethical and cultural aspects of design and the design process. Prerequisites: ENGM 301, ENGM 320, or permission of instructor

ENGM 333. Manufacturing Process 1.0 course credit

This course introduces mechanical engineering students to the manufacturing process. It focuses on existing and developing facilities that actually make things and on the process of making things out of metals, plastics, wood, ceramics and modern composite materials. Topics include forming, separating, conditioning, finishing and more. Prerequisites: ENGM 270 or ENGM 209/PHYS 209 or permission of instructor.

ENGM 380. Mechanical Design 1.0 course credit

This course is an introduction to mechanical design. If focuses on the design processes, applications of fundamental design ideas to machine components. It examines the feasibility of a design as well as human factors, creativity, and the ethical implications of a design and cultural implications of a design and the design process. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: ENGM 209/PHYS 209 and ENGM 201 or permission of instructor.