Courses

Latin courses

LATN 101G. Elementary Latin I 1.0 course credit

An introduction to Latin grammar and syntax with simple readings and translation.

LATN 102G. Elementary Latin II 1.0 course credit

Continuation of LATN 101. Students who have not completed LATN 101 or the
equivalent must consult with the instructor prior to registration.

LATN 200. Directed Readings: Topic 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

Reading, translation, and discussion of selected texts to be determined on the basis of student needs. Students must have completed LATN 101 and 102 or the equivalent, or receive instructor permission, to be eligible to take the course. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

LATN 203. Understanding Spoken Latin 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

A variety of audio and video resources are used in order to develop comprehension skills in understanding spoken Latin and beginning to employ it. May be repeated for credit.

LATN 300. Directed Readings: Topic 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

Same general content as LATN 200, but with higher expectations of performance. Students who have not completed LATN 200 or the equivalent must consult with the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

LATN 400. Directed Readings: Topic 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

Same general content as LATN 300, but with higher expectations of performance. Students who have not completed LATN 300 or the equivalent must consult with the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

LATN 401. Individualized Study 0.25 to 1.0 course credit

Independent study in the Latin language or in individual Latin authors not included in regular courses or studied in greater depth than a regular course permits, or an internship in teaching Latin. For advanced students only. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

LATN 420. Prose Composition 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

Prose composition in Latin. For advanced students only.


Greek courses

GREK 101G. Classical Greek I 1.0 course credit

A study of grammar and syntax of ancient Greek with simple readings and translation.

GREK 102G. Classical Greek II 1.0 course credit

Continuation of GREK 101. Students who have not completed GREK 101 or the equivalent must consult with the instructor prior to registration.

GREK 111G. Elementary Biblical Greek I 1.0 course credit

A study of grammar and syntax of Biblical Greek with simple readings and translation.

GREK 112G. Elementary Biblical Greek II 1.0 course credit

Continuation of GREK 111. Students who have not completed GREK 111 or the equivalent must consult with the instructor prior to registration.

GREK 200. Directed Readings: Topic 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

Reading, translation, and discussion of selected texts to be determined on the basis of student needs. Students must have completed GREK 101/111 and 102/112 or the equivalent, or receive instructor permission, to be eligible to take the course. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

GREK 212. Biblical Greek 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

Selections from the Greek Septuagint and New Testament. Prerequisite: GREK 101 or its equivalent.

GREK 300. Directed Readings: Topic 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

Same general content as GREK 200, but with higher expectations of performance. Students who have not completed GREK 200 or the equivalent must consult with the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

GREK 400. Directed Readings: Topic 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

Same general content as GREK 300, but with higher expectations of performance.. Students who have not completed GREK 300 or the equivalent must consult with the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

GREK 401. Individualized Study 0.25 to 1.0 course credit

Independent study in the Greek language or in individual Greek authors not included in regular courses or studied in greater depth than a regular course permits, or an internship in teaching Greek. For advanced students only. May be repeated for credit with different topics.


Civilization courses

CLAS 120. Non-Western Ancient Society: Topic 0.5 or 1.0 course credit

(Cross-listed as HIST 120) A close examination of a particular aspect of ancient history, society, and/or archaeology, with a focus on one or more non-Western cultures, often along with Greece and/or Rome. Each time it is offered, this course covers a different topic, including world archaeology, ancient science and technology, ancient cultural diversity, etc. Focus on primary materials and evidence. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 130. Ancient Society: Topic 0.5 or 1.0 course credit

(Cross-listed as HIST 130) A close examination of a particular aspect of Graeco-Roman history, society, and/or archaeology. Each time it is offered, this course covers a different social topic, including the ancient family, athletics, education, political organization and theory, military life, utopias, etc. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 195. Archaeology Lab 0.25-1.0 course credit

(Cross-listed as HIST 195) In Archaeology Lab students engage in archaeological techniques that transcend geographic or chronological focus. Students will gain hands-on experience working with Native American lithic and ceramic artifacts as well as ancient Mediterranean antiquities from the Shields Collection. Students will learn the proper techniques to handle authentic antiquities in a scientific manner by spending class time cataloging, maintaining, and promoting Monmouth College’s collection. Additionally, students will explore new technologies and their applications to the field of archaeological science, skills which are applicable to analyzing the archaeological material of any civilization. CLAS 195 and/or HIST 195 may be taken for up to 1.0 credit (i.e, up to four times, if the course is offered for .25 credit each) toward the Classics major.

CLAS 200. Introduction to Classical Studies 0.5 course credit

This seminar surveys various fields of classics, including linguistics, archaeology, and history, and introduces prospective majors, minors and serious students of the classics to various research tools important to the discipline.

CLAS 201. Classics Seminar: Topic 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

In this seminar a central topic in classical studies is examined from a variety of disciplinary models and approaches. Intended for majors, minors, and serious students of the classics. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 205. Classical and Medieval Philosophy 1.0 course credit

(Cross-listed as PHIL 205) This course will offer a survey of some of the primary texts of ancient Greek and medieval philosophy in their cultural contexts. After considering Greek philosophy, we will trace some of its impact on the development of medieval philosophy. We will study the influence of the Arab-Muslim scholarship of medieval Spain both for its role in preserving, translating, and expanding on Greek texts and for its foundational role in the development of European culture.

CLAS 210G. Ancient Literature: Topic 0.5 or 1.0 course credit

A study in translation of literary themes and ancient genres as works of art, this course considers ancient Greek and Roman expressions of the creative imagination in literature and the theatre and their links with contemporary culture and the fine arts. Each time it is offered, this course covers different genres, including epic, tragedy, or comedy, or different themes, such as the love and friendship, gender and sexuality, and Hollywood’s coverage of the ancient world. A full course credit, or two 0.5-credit courses, of Ancient Literature satisfies the General Education requirement for “Beauty and Meaning in Works of Art.” May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 224. Word Elements: Topic 0.5 course credit

An English vocabulary-building course that emphasizes the Greek and/or Latin roots of the English language, the meanings of prefixes and suffixes from Greek and Latin, and basic linguistic concepts. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 225. Scientific Terminology: Topic 0.5 course credit

Examines Greek and Latin word elements in a variety of scientific language contexts, including medicine, biology, chemistry and physics. Considers ways to use technical dictionaries and Greek and Latin roots of the English language to understand and use scientific terminology. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 230G. Classical Mythology: Topic 0.5 or 1.0 course credit

A survey of literary and artistic expressions of ancient Greek and Roman myths, their influence in the development of human culture, and their links with the mythologies of other peoples. This course considers a different topic every term, including “The Trojan War and its Aftermath,” “Dionysus and Theban Myths,” and “Goddesses and Heroines.” A full course credit, or two 0.5-credit courses, of Mythology (either 230 or 330) satisfies the General Education requirement for “Beauty and Meaning in Works of Art.” May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 235. Greek, Roman, and Mediterranean History 1.0 course credit

An analytical overview of major events, trends, and figures from the worlds of ancient Greece and Rome, and of other Mediterranean nations and peoples with whom they interacted.

CLAS 240. Ancient Society: Topic 0.5 or 1.0 course credit

(Cross-listed as HIST 230) A close examination of a particular aspect of Graeco-Roman history and society, with special attention to the ways in which the lives of ancient Greeks and Romans were and were not different from those in the modern world. Each time it is offered, this course covers a different social topic, including the ancient family, athletics, education, political organization and theory, social class, labor practices, slavery, military life, nature and the environment, utopias, archaeology of all sorts, etc. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 245. Ancient Religious Reflections: Topic 0.5 course credit

Deals with different aspects of religion in the world of the ancient Mediterranean. Topics include: “Sacred Places,” “Mystery Religions Past and Present,” and “Classical Mythology and Religion.” While special attention is given to the ancient Greeks and Romans, the civilizations of other Mediterranean peoples, such as the Egyptians, are also discussed and special effort will be made to put these ancient reflections in a modern context. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 250. Special Topics. variable credit

May be repeated for credit.

CLAS 290. Academic Travel Course: Topic 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

An academic travel course in which classical topics are studied at archeological sites, in museums, and at other on-site locations in the Graeco-Roman world. The course includes on-campus meetings prior to departure, readings, and on-site lectures. Prerequisite: None. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 295. Classics Day Leadership 0.25 course credit

(Cross-listed as HIST 295) Students in this course will take leadership roles in making the biennial Classics Day a success. This leadership will be divided between students based on their academic strengths and interests; students will need to justify the roles they choose in contributing to this complex event as having relevance to their majors or other academic concentrations. Between weekly meetings and distributed tasks between meetings, we will plot out Classics Day’s events and who will carry them out, and we will take the steps necessary to make those events work, to receive funding, to publicize Classics Day effectively, to follow up on it appropriately, and to pursue recognition, via awards or other means, after the event is done. The high point of the course will be Classics Day itself. CLAS 295 and/or HIST 295 may be taken for up to 1.0 credit (i.e, up to four times, if the course is offered for .25 credit each) toward the Classics major.

CLAS 301. Classics Seminar: Topic 0.25 or 0.5 course credit

In this seminar, a central topic in classical studies is examined from a variety of disciplinary models and approaches. Intended for majors, minors and serious students of Classics. Same general content as CLAS 201, but with higher expectations of performance. May be repeated for credit, as long as topics differ.

CLAS 310G Ancient Literature: Topic 0.5 or 1.0 course credit

A study in translation of literary themes and ancient genres as works of art, this course considers ancient Greek and Roman expressions of the creative imagination in literature and the theatre and their links with contemporary culture and the fine arts. Each time it is offered, this course covers different genres, including epic, tragedy, or comedy, or different themes, such as the love and friendship, gender and sexuality, and Hollywood’s coverage of the ancient world. Same general content as CLAS 210, but with higher expectations of performance. A full course credit, or two 0.5-credit courses, of Ancient Literature satisfies the General Education requirement for “Beauty and Meaning in Works of Art.” May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 330G. Classical Mythology: Topic 0.5 or 1.0 course credit

A survey of literary and artistic expressions of ancient Greek and Roman myths, their influence in the development of human culture, and their links with the mythologies of other peoples. This course considers a different topic every term, including “The Trojan War and its Aftermath,” “Dionysus and Theban Myths,” and “Goddesses and Heroines.” Same general content as CLAS 230, but with higher expectations of performance. A full course credit, or two 0.5-credit courses, of Mythology (either 230 or 330) satisfies the General Education requirement for “Beauty and Meaning in Works of Art.” May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 335. Greek, Roman, and Mediterranean History 1.0 course credit

An analytical overview of major events, trends, and figures from the worlds of ancient Greece and Rome, and of other Mediterranean nations and peoples with whom they interacted. Same general content as CLAS 235, but with higher expectations of performance.

CLAS 340. Ancient Society: Topic 0.5 or 1.0 course credit

A close examination of a particular aspect of Graeco-Roman history and society, with special attention to the ways in which the lives of ancient Greeks and Romans were and were not different from those in the modern world. Each time it is offered, this course covers a different social topic, including the ancient family, athletics, education, political organization and theory, social class, labor practices, slavery, military life, nature and the environment, utopias, archaeology of all sorts, etc. Same general content as CLAS 240, but with higher expectations of performance. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CLAS 401. Individualized Study 0.25 to 1.0 course credit

Independent study of classical topics not included in regular courses or studied in greater depth than a regular course permits. For advanced students only. Prerequisite: Permission by the instructor. May be repeated with different topics.

Students in Sports in Ancient Greece and Rome practice their discus technique. Students in Sports in Ancient Greece and Rome practice their discus technique.