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Kellogg to share Disney, CBS experiences at Whiteman Lecture

03/27/2014
Mary Kellogg, co-owner and executive vice president of marketing, sales and operations for Titanic Museum Attractions, will deliver Monmouth College’s annual Wendell Whiteman Memorial Lecture on April 3 at 11 a.m. in the Dahl Chapel and Auditorium.
 
Titled “How One Letter Can Change Your Life,” her lecture is free and open to the public. She will share experiences from her extensive career in entertainment, which has seen her move from developing television programs to developing attractions.
 
Kellogg served for 20 years as executive vice president for television for The Walt Disney Company, during which she oversaw more than 100 television shows, including “Live with Regis and (Kathie Lee) Kelly.” She also helped create and develop “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” (both on television and as an attraction at Walt Disney World and Disneyland).
        
Kellogg was also an executive director in both marketing and programming at CBS for 10 years, and she shared multiple Emmy honors during her tenures at Disney and CBS. 
        
In her current executive role with Cedar Bay Entertainment, Kellogg is in charge of developing and coordinating marketing, advertising, sales, public relations and merchandising strategies for the company’s Titanic operation in Branson, Mo., and for the Titanic attraction in Pigeon Forge, Tenn.
        
“Based on exceptional marketing success,” Titanic was selected for the 2010 Best of Branson Award in the Amusement Theme Park category by the U.S. Commerce Association.
        
Many speakers in the Whiteman Lecture series, which began in 1992, have roots in the campus or local community, and Kellogg continues that trend. Born and raised in Monmouth, she graduated from Monmouth High School before attending Columbia College in Chicago.
        
The lecture series brings prominent leaders of American business and industry to the Monmouth College campus. It is named in memory of Wendell Whiteman, an alumnus of the college and long-time executive of Security Savings Bank in Monmouth.