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Archaeology Lecture series, Great Decisions continue in CSB

02/02/2018

MONMOUTH, Ill. – Area residents and the campus community will have two opportunities to broaden their knowledge on Feb. 7 when a pair of ongoing series will be held at Monmouth College.

The next archaeology lecture, “The Archaeology of Violence: Rationalizing Atrocities in Ancient Greece,” will be presented by Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics Jennifer Martinez-Morales in the Pattee Auditorium of the Center for Science and Business.

Political science professor Farhat Haq will lead a Great Decisions discussion on “China and America: The New Geopolitical Equation” in Room 276 of the Center for Science and Business.

Both events will be held at 7:30 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

Martinez will investigate ancient wartime atrocities committed against noncombatants, especially women, and ancient attempts at rationalizing such behavior.

The archaeology lecture series is sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America Western Illinois Society and the College’s Department of Classics.

Haq will discuss how China has implemented a wide-ranging strategy of economic outreach and expansion of all its national capacities in the last 15 years. Whereas the United States has taken a step back from multilateral trade agreements and discarded the Trans-Pacific Partnership, China has made inroads through efforts such as the Belt and Road Initiative and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.

The Great Decisions group will attempt to answer such questions as: “What are Beijing’s geopolitical objectives?” and “What leadership and political conditions in each society underlie growing Sino-American tensions?” They will also explore policies Washington might adopt to address this circumstance.

Great Decisions is a nationwide program sponsored by the Foreign Policy Association, a non-partisan, non-governmental association that works to increase Americans’ understanding of significant foreign policy issues.