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Jordan village, Israel-U.S. relations to be discussed on Jan. 29

01/22/2014
Monmouth College will host a pair of events on Jan. 29 at 7:30 p.m. in the Center for Science and Business. Both are free and open to the public.
 
In the Pattee Auditorium, which is located on the lower floor of the CSB, Knox College faculty member Danielle Fatkin will present the next archaeology lecture, titled “A Village on the Edge: Understanding Life on the Eastern Roman Frontier.”
 
In CSB 273, Mohsin Masood, one of the organizers of the college’s Great Decisions discussion forum, will introduce the topic “Israel and the U.S.” Approximately one hour of group discussion will follow his remarks.
 
“The modern Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has a well-educated work force, a lively tech sector and a busy real estate industry,” said Fatkin, who is an assistant professor of history. “Yet the country still struggles with necessities, including sufficient food and fresh drinking water for its rapidly expanding population. Life in Roman and Byzantine Arabia was a similar mixture of wealth and want.”
 
Ongoing excavations at Dhiban, Jordan, reveal the transformations wrought in one rural community by successive waves of Romanization, Christianization and Islamization. Fatkin’s lecture will highlight major finds from excavations conducted during the summer of 2013, including a Byzantine house and a Roman water system. Advanced recovery techniques also revealed the existence of squatter settlements on the site after the end of major occupation in the early Islamic period, indicating that the site remained important to people living in the region, even when most of the site had been formally abandoned.
 
At the Great Decisions program, Masood will discuss how new “game-changing” technologies, from robotic planes to cyberweapons to 3D printing and human enhancement, are moving from science fiction to battlefield reality – all during an age of fiscal austerity.
 
Great Decisions is a nationwide program sponsored by the Foreign Policy Association, a non-partisan, non-governmental association that works to increase Americans’ understanding of significant foreign policy issues